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July 3, 2014 Posted by Tahir in Travel

My thoughts on jinn, observation, imagination, and dreams

Granada, SpainMany thanks to those of you were able to attend my Reddit AMA live. For those who were unable to attend, I’ll be sharing a selection of questions and answers over the next couple of weeks. To view the entire AMA, please click the above link. 

Q. Let’s say you pissed off a Jinn. Big-time. He says: “I intend to punish you. But before I do, I’ll let you choose who or what you are going to be next. You can be anyone or anything except you.” Who or what would you choose to be?

A. I’d want to be transformed as a man on a journey with a magic ring on his finger. The ring can’t create wealth of any kind, but can lead to fabulous adventure.

Q. Are there any things one can do by one self that would help one to concentrate and observe better or can that only be helped with special training?

A. I think it’s a question of learning to focus in a new way. I’m so against the kind of instruction we all had in school because I think it kills the default settings in us.

I often sit in a cafe — say here in India — and will not allow myself to get up until I have appreciated something obvious in a new way. It’s a kind of game. It takes retuning, but it’s surprisingly easy.

Q. How is one to tell if one’s imagination is not running away with one?

A. I love imagination and attuning myself to it. Again, listen to your gut and don’t allow your programmed mind to take control. Look for the default setting within you.

Q. When you are engulfed in one of your projects, do you also dream about it?… What i mean is, do dreams, sometimes, show you solutions to problems at hand?

A. I am obsessive and it’s a mixed blessing. It gives me huge energy and commitment. But, at the same time, it means I’m a bit of a nightmare to live with. Because when I’m working on something, that project is all I can think about. Yes, I certainly dream of what I’m working on. And, I try to go on long walks and allow my subconscious mind to solve the problems and conundrums that always surface. The subconscious is the greatest problem-solving mechanism we have. But we seem to forget that it’s there, waiting for us to ask its help.

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