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June 21, 2008 Posted by Tahir in Travel

Black

On the east wall of the courtyard near to where I am sitting, there is a shadow. It’s unlike any normal shadow, shades of grey, because it is very very black. But the colour is not the strange thing about it. Rather, it’s that this shadow is not cast by any object. It’s a shadow without a reason.

I first noticed it three weeks ago. The bright afternoon light was beginning to wane, and the sound of donkeys baking in the shantytown was lessening with the heat. I was working on an article, feeling good about myself for working so hard, looking out at the birds swooping down onto the fountain — a single drop of water sufficient to satiate their thirst. I looked up. The birds flew off, up into the bougainvillea. Suddenly I saw it, as plain as the nose on my face… the shadow without a reason.
I called the guardians from the garden. They lined up and waited for instructions. Nothing worries them more than being called in the late afternoon. They hide down at the stables smoking and drinking endless mint tea. A call from me usually ends in a demand, albeit one couched in politeness. They sauntered in, looking sheepish. I pointed at the wall.
‘That,’ I said.
‘What?’
‘The shadow.’
Osman looked at me, frowned, cocked his head to the side.
‘Yes Monsieur Tahir?’
‘Well it’s a shadow without a reason.’
The guardians turned to take another look. They looked hard, frowned again, scratched their heads, smiled, laughed, and then all of a sudden their amusement was  wiped away… wiped away by fear.
‘It’s not good,’ said Hamza.
‘Not good at all,’ Osman echoed.
What shall we do?’ I said.
Just then, Zohra came out of the kitchen, overwhelmed with curiosity. She ordered to know what was going on.
Osman pointed.
‘A shadow,’ said Hamza nervously, ‘a shadow without a reason.’
Zohra stepped back, pushed a hand to her headscarf, leant forward, squinted.
‘Tsk! Tsk! Tsk!’ she crowed.
I asked what she meant.
‘You silly men.’
‘Why are we silly?’ I asked.
‘Because only men would waste time worrying about something like this, wasting time when there is work to be done!’
‘But I have been working. And now we are trying to solve this problem,’ I said.
Hamza waved his hands on the wall, like a child doing shadow puppets.
‘We’re making a scientific study,’ I said.
‘Yes,’ said Osman, ‘that’s what we are doing.’
‘Nonsense,’ replied Zohra, ‘you are wasting time. And that’s all men do, their whole lives. They waste time.’
A day passed, and the shadow didn’t move. Evening faded to night, and with the dawn, the shadow returned… very faint at first, but darkening as the hours passed, until it was very black again. Eventually I couldn’t stand it any more. I had to know the reason for the shadow without a reason. So I went to get my camera. If I could get a picture of it, I thought, then I could study it more closely. I took a photo of the wall with the shadow… click. Looked at the image. Weird, I thought to myself… the shadow’s not there on film.
Just then Zohra shuffled out of the kitchen and jerked her head. A jerk of Zohra’s head is a demand for information.
‘It’s strange,’ I said. ‘I took a picture of the shadow, but…’
‘But…?’
‘But it didn’t come out on film.’
Zohra peered into the screen at the back of the camera. She was going to say something. Then her expression wavered. She looked extremely fearful. It was a look I had experienced before, one conjured by the thought of the supernatural.
I shook my head.
‘No,’ I said, ‘not that.’
Zohra nodded. She spun round and touched the walls, kissed her knuckle and said a prayer.
Anything at Dar Khalifa that has no obvious explanation, is put down to the Jinns, and Zohra is the queen of stirring up fear of them. That is, if anyone needs their imagination to be stirred — which they don’t.
I ushered her back into the kitchen. Then, with all my strength, I moved the big whicker log basket in front of the shadow. Remarkably, the patch of darkness disappeared. I smiled to myself. Zohra peered out of the kitchen at hearing the noise.
‘It’s gone,’ I said.
‘You have hidden it.’
‘No, really, it’s gone away. Vanished. Just like that.’
The maid narrowed her eyes.
‘I don’t believe you,’ she said.
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